Bible and calendars
Bible and calendars
PREFACE BIBLE AND CALENDAR
I. PRELIMINARY NOTIONS
1. METHODOLOGY BIBLE AND CALENDAR
2. A QUITE ANCIENT NEW CALENDAR
3. ABOUT CALENDARS
4. A LUSTRUM
5. SWIFT AS THE WIND
II. REDATING JESUS' DEATH
1. DID JESUS' CRUCIFIXION ACTUALLY HAPPEN ON APRIL, 7th, 30 ?
2. RECONSTRUCTING OLD LUNAR OBSERVATIONS
3. EASTER FELL ON A SATURDAY
4. NEW YEAR WAS A SATURDAY TOO
5. THE ONLY LUNAR EXPLANATION
6. THE LONG MINISTRY OF JOHN THE BAPTIST
7. A NEW READING OF DANIEL'S PROPHECY
8. "THEY HAD BEEN REBUILDING THE TEMPLE FOR 46 YEARS..."
9. THE ROMAN POINT OF VIEW
10. EXIT PILATE - ARMY MANOEUVRES IN THE EAST
11. PAUL'S TRAVELS
12. "AND JESUS HIMSELF BEGAN TO BE ABOUT 30 YEARS OF AGE"
13. CONCLUSION
III. THE SECOND TEMPLE CALENDAR
1. WHAT CALENDAR WAS IN USE AT THE TIME
2. ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF JUBILEE YEARS
3. RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTIQUE CALENDAR
4. THE CORRECT WAY TO USE FLAVIUS JOSEPHUS
5. THE CREATION OF THE WORLD ERA
IV. CONCLUSION
V. ANNEXE
FINAL REMARKS

II. REDATING JESUS' DEATH



   

11. PAUL'S TRAVELS




The date we suggest concerning Jesus' death makes the duration of John the Baptist's preaching longer. What about Paul's ministry then ?

The biblical book of The Acts, which recounts the Gospel early times, is rather sparing of chronological milestones.
Nevertheless, at the time of Paul's stay in Corinth during his second travel, Luke specifies that Paul was taken to the Court : "And when Gallio was the deputy of Achaia,[...]" (The Acts, 18, 12)
During the last century in Delphi, an epigraphic document was found ; the name of Gallio was set in stone there, which confirms Luke's version.

We were able to ascertain by crosschecking other texts that Gallio had been in office from July 51 and for a very short period, about a year.

Paul began this second journey shortly after the "council of Jerusalem" recounted in The Acts, chapter 15.

The distance between Jerusalem and Corinth is about 1243 miles. To cover such a distance, a man in the prime of life had to walk for two or three months. Since Paul was visiting the communities which had been founded in Minor Asia during his first journey there and since he also travelled in Europe to found new ones in Philippi and Thessalonica and Beroea and Corinth, we can safely assume that he had left Jerusalem over more than a year. It then sets the council of Jerusalem around the year 49 or 50.

Paul himself provides us with a few time clues in his letters. After he converted he left for Arabia, probably for the Nabatean realm of Petra. When he came back to Damascus he found out that a representative of King Aretas was seeking him so he had to flee from town in a basket. This must have happened before 39 or 40, when King Aretas IV died (Galatians, 1, 17 - 2 Corinthians 11, 32-33).

Paul is even more precise in Galatians, 1, 18 : "Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to see Peter [...]".
And then again in Galatians, 2, 1 : "Then fourteen years after I went up again to Jerusalem with Barnabas [...]".

Two very important questions are set :
1- What is the date of origin of these time intervals ?
2- Are they accomplished periods of time or, as it so often happened at the time, do they signify the nth year - the last one being yet unfinished ? Cf : "resurrected on the third day".

We can answer quite easily to the 1st question, since Paul probably considered his conversion as a fresh start, thus a new beginning.

It is much more difficult to answer the 2nd.

But whatever the answer may be, we can at least set with great probability Paul's conversion at the end of 36 or the beginning of 37, which is not in contradiction with Jesus dying in March 36.

Moreover, the nine first chapters of The Acts are testimony enough of the fierce desire of the Sanhedrin to quell this heretical sect which expressed itself in synagogues and in the Temple squares. The persecution of Jesus' first followers began quite early : harassment on Whit Sunday, Stephen's stoning soon after, Saul's exactions towards the newborn community.

Thence setting Paul's conversion on the road to Damascus, six months or a year after Jesus' crucifixion is no absurdity.

EASTERN PLOYS - ARMY MANOUVRES IN THE EAST

According to Flavius Josephus, Herod Antipas fell in love with his late half-brother's wife Herodias after the former died in 34.
John the Baptist severely reprimanded him about that and was then imprisonned in Machaerus and killed (J.A. XVIII, 47), thus bearing out Daniel's prophecy (Daniel, 9, 26) : "And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself [...]", i.e. 5 years after the 15th year of Tiberius Cĉsar (August, 20th, 28 to August 20qth, 29) in which he began to preach, according to Luke (Luke, 3, 1).

On the other hand, Herod Antipas had been living with the daughter of the Nabatean King Aretas IV for a very long time and the latter, upon seeing his daughter coming back to Petra, he declared war on Herod and defeated him in 35. In Jewish Antiquities (J.A. XVIII, 117) Flavius Josephus says that : "according to the Jews, the catastrophy came upon the army to avenge John the Baptist. God wanted to punish Herod."

These troubles along the Roman Empire frontiers led the legions to counter-attack on Vitellius' orders. Vitellius was Rome legate in Syria in 36 and until Tiberius' death at the beginning of 37.
We can therefore explain that Vitellius came to Jerusalem two years in a row to show off his authority upon Herod, who had fallen into disgrace. And we can as well justify the allusion to a reconciliation made by Luke (Luke, 23, 12) : "And the same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together...", on the very morning of Jesus' crucifixion... which decidedly cannot have taken place in 30 nor in 33.

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