Bible and calendars
Bible and calendars
PREFACE BIBLE AND CALENDAR
I. PRELIMINARY NOTIONS
1. METHODOLOGY BIBLE AND CALENDAR
2. A QUITE ANCIENT NEW CALENDAR
3. ABOUT CALENDARS
4. A LUSTRUM
5. SWIFT AS THE WIND
II. REDATING JESUS' DEATH
1. DID JESUS' CRUCIFIXION ACTUALLY HAPPEN ON APRIL, 7th, 30 ?
2. RECONSTRUCTING OLD LUNAR OBSERVATIONS
3. EASTER FELL ON A SATURDAY
4. NEW YEAR WAS A SATURDAY TOO
5. THE ONLY LUNAR EXPLANATION
6. THE LONG MINISTRY OF JOHN THE BAPTIST
7. A NEW READING OF DANIEL'S PROPHECY
8. "THEY HAD BEEN REBUILDING THE TEMPLE FOR 46 YEARS..."
9. THE ROMAN POINT OF VIEW
10. EXIT PILATE - ARMY MANOEUVRES IN THE EAST
11. PAUL'S TRAVELS
12. "AND JESUS HIMSELF BEGAN TO BE ABOUT 30 YEARS OF AGE"
13. CONCLUSION
III. THE SECOND TEMPLE CALENDAR
1. WHAT CALENDAR WAS IN USE AT THE TIME
2. ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF JUBILEE YEARS
3. RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTIQUE CALENDAR
4. THE CORRECT WAY TO USE FLAVIUS JOSEPHUS
5. THE CREATION OF THE WORLD ERA
IV. CONCLUSION
V. ANNEXE
FINAL REMARKS

I. PRELIMINARY NOTIONS



   

5. SWIFT AS THE WIND




To get on with our study,  we need to know how long it took to sail from Jerusalem to Rome.
In order to know that, we shall investigate antique travel stories and find out what was the average speed of ships at that time.

The Greek astronomer and explorer Pytheas, that both Strabo and Pliny the Elder mention, says that " Thulea, the most remote island, was situated [...] 6 navigation days away from [Scotland]". There he reached the ice field. Whether Thulea means Iceland or Norway, the distance is more or less the same : 560 miles. It gives us a first reckoning of 93 miles per day.

During the XIIth century, the Andalusian traveler Ibn Djubayr declared that in March "he spent 30 days at sea before dropping anchor in Alexandria harbour", i.e. an average speed of 62 miles per day.

We also have Christopher Colombus' ship log at our disposal. It took him 9 days to reach the Canary Islands (i.e. about 808 miles) then 34 days to land (i.e. about 3107 miles), that is an average of 93 miles per day.

The distance between the Rome harbour Ostia Antica and Cĉsarea Maritima in Palestine, through the Messina strait, was of 1430 miles or so. We can then reckon that it took 15 to 23 days to sail from one port to the other, plus one riding day to go from Ostia to Rome and then one more from Cĉsarea to Jerusalem; this rough reckoning does not take the stops into account though sailors mostly used coastal navigation since winds were milder near the shore.

Let us also have a look into speed records : 9 days from Carthage or Messina to Alexandria when the etesian winds blew from the North during heatwaves, which makes an average of 125 miles per day.

In conclusion, the journey from Rome to Jerusalem must have lasted from 3 weeks to a month and in any case 15 days at least.

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